ROA (BEL) – 7 Bath Street

Nomadic and enigmatic Belgium artist ROA is part prolific street artist, part avid naturalist and his aerosol work often features animals endemic to the locations he visits, like the giant native tuatara he has painted here.

7 Bath Street.

Be Free (AUS) – 14 Burlington Street

Be Free began making feminine and mischievous street art using found objects, stencils and aerosol art after moving to Melbourne and becoming fascinated by the artworks that were plastered and sprayed on its inner-city laneways.

14 Burlington Street.

Jon Thom (DUD) – 8 Vogel Street

This was the first attempt at a major urban mural by Dunedin artist Jon Thom, who draws inspiration for his distinctive monochromatic portraits in Dunedin’s spectacular landscapes and dramatic weather.

8 Vogel Street.

Andy McCready (DUD) and Sam Ovens (DUD) – 16 Vogel Street

Dunedin artists Sam Ovens and Andy McCready created these retro, bookend style pieces. Sam describes this piece as is homage to loud music and psychedelic imagery, while Andy has created one of her signature coiffed ladies in her pop art styled work. The two pieces reflect one another through their mutual vibrant colour schemes and pop culture references.

16 Vogel Street.

Sean Duffell, Dager, Harley Jones, Sean Duffell, Mica Still, Bongo, Be Free, Trust Me, Rame – 38 Water Street

This colourful and exciting mural collaboration on Water St was begun as part of the first Dunedin Street Art Festival in 2014 and was completed early in 2015. It demonstrates the unique style of eight local and international street artists.

38 Water Street.

Maggie Covell (DUD) – 58 Vogel Street

The work is entitled “The Witching Hour” and is inspired by Victorian illustrator Aubrey Beardsley and 16th century German woodcuts. It’s a piece about the dichotomy between good and evil, surfaces and the juxtaposition between light and dark. The birds act as a motif for lost souls and dark dreams, they sing Nightmare songs, whereas the halos behind the figures illuminate the path toward the period of awake, all of which highlight the struggle during the night.

58 Vogel Street.

Phlegm (UK) – 76 Vogel Street

Māori waka and a steam-punk like submarine (a reference to the incident where a Japanese submarine was supported in the Otago Harbour) emerge from a fish’s mouth in this distinctive piece by Phlegm which incorporates local history alongside his distinctly fantastical style.

76 Vogel Street.

Devon Smith (DUD) – 76 Vogel Street

Local artist (and tattooist) Devon Smith creates distinctive delicate sketches and paintings, drawing inspiration from children’s books, fairytales cartoons and comics.

76 Vogel Street.

Hyuro (ARG) – 76 Vogel Street

Argentinian street artist Hyuro created this piece entitled “Unoccupied” depicting a suspended dress to reflect the vacant status of the historic building in the warehouse precinct on which it was created.

76 Vogel Street.

Emma Francesca (DUD) – 76 Vogel Street

Artwork titled “Empress of the Penguins”. This is Emma’s first outdoor piece of this scale and we absolutely love it – hopefully she’ll want to do more after this!

76 Vogel Street.

Sean Duffel (NZ) – 43 Jetty Street

Dunedin native Sean Duffell’s idiosyncratic style which draws inspiration from native flora and fauna can be spotted in cities up and down the length of the country, and he is one of the most recognisable and prolific street artists New Zealand has to offer.

43 Jetty Street.

Toothfish (NZ) – 8 Wharf Street

“The Revenge of the Ocean #1” by Toothfish. Huge new artwork in Wharf Street.

8 Wharf Street.

Aroha Novak and Guy Howard-Smith (DUD) – 9 Buller Street

Local artist cooperative Stickum (Guy Howard Smith and Aroha Novak) are interested in bringing the history of Dunedin vividly into the present with this colourful mural which highlights the different cultures and people which settled in Dunedin and their strong ties to the land.

9 Buller Street.

Natalia Rak (POL) – 48 Bond Street

Polish artist Natalia Rak’s mural entitled “Love is in the Air” is characteristic of her cheeky, playful and hyper-realistic style and reflects her passion for bold colours.

48 Bond Street.

Emmanuel Jarus (CAN) and Caratoes (BEL) – 80 Bond Street (down alleyway)

Quick collaboration piece titled “Chasing Waterfalls” completed in January 2017.

80 Bond Street (down alleyway).

Be Free (AUS) – 106 Bond Street

Be Free began making feminine and mischievous street art using found objects, stencils and aerosol art after moving to Melbourne and becoming fascinated by the artworks that were plastered and sprayed on its inner-city laneways.

106 Bond Street.

Be Free (AUS) – 106 Bond Street

Be Free began making feminine and mischievous street art using found objects, stencils and aerosol art after moving to Melbourne and becoming fascinated by the artworks that were plastered and sprayed on its inner-city laneways.

106 Bond Street.

Andy McCready (DUD) – 10 Carroll Street

This pair of candy-coloured murals (‘Motel Mints’ and ‘Pink Smokers’) by Dunedin artist Andy McCready are a nostalgic ode to the atomic era. Drawing stylistically from comic books and consumer culture, their mid-century pop sensibility evokes road trips, retro motels and the effortless cool of rebellious girls.

10 Carroll Street.

Pixel Pancho (ITA) – 365 Princes Street

“Riding Dreams” by Pixel Pancho demonstrates a complex interweaving of the human form, flora, and metal to create the surreal image of a ‘not quite human’ boy riding a fantastical metal horse reflecting his fascination with 1950s robots.

365 Princes Street.

Hyuro (ARG) – Viewed from inside Vanguard Cafe, 329 Princes Street

Argentinian street artist Hyuro’s two-storied Bond Street mural reflects her larger body of work by speaking to both social norms and the use of public space in the city.

329 Princes Street.

Phlegm (UK) and Pixel Pancho (ITA) – 5 Stafford Street

This piece is a world first collaboration by Pixel Pancho and Phlegm and presents the successful mixing of their own unique style creating a surreal battle between Pixel Pancho’s robots and Phlegm’s sloth-like creatures.

5 Stafford Street.

Dal East (CHINA) – 25 Stafford Street

Chinese artist Dal East represents New Zealand’s extinct Haast Eagle and is reflective of his unique style which presents the frenetic shape of animals and people as if they have been constructed out of shards of metal.

25 Stafford Street.

Snotrag (AUS) – 26 Stafford Street

The vibrant horned skulls that guard what used to be Glue Gallery were created by Melbourne based artist Snotrag, who often uses punk and tribal inspired aesthetic to bring life to abandoned and derelict buildings and spaces.

26 Stafford Street.

Mica Still (NZ) – 8 Stafford Street

Mica Still is a Wellington based artist, whose colourful dreams of vibrant and psychedelic wolves, bears and owls can be seen on walls in Auckland, Wellington and now Dunedin.

8 Stafford Street.

Phlegm (UK) – 12 Manse Street

“Song Bird Pipe Organ” presents one of Phlegm’s distinctively mysterious figures playing an unusual organ, releasing native New Zealand birds (including the Kākāpō and the Takahē) as he plays.

12 Manse Street.

Bezt (POL) – 4 Broadway Street

Bezt (Etam Cru) is a street artist from Warsaw, Poland with an impressive body of darkly surreal work most of which has been created on a huge scale as demonstrated by this gigantic piece created in 2015.

4 Broadway Street.

Aroha Novak and Guy Howard-Smith (DUD) – 179 Rattray Street

Local artist cooperative Stickum (Aroha Novak and Guy Howard-Smith) are interested in bringing the history of Dunedin vividly into the present with this colourful mural which highlights the different cultures and people which settled in Dunedin and their strong ties to the land.

179 Rattray Street.

Fintan Magee (AUS) – 149 Rattray Street

Australian street artist Fintan Magee has redefined the limits of street art by creating gigantic murals in Australia and South America that are regularly three-storeys high. “Chasing the Thin White Cloud” is his largest work to date, and features three local children.

149 Rattray Street.

Phlegm (UK) – 24 Moray Place

British street artist and muralist Phlegm is the inventor of fantastic and surreal beasties with this mythical creature taking on New Zealand’s Kākāpō-like features.

24 Moray Place.

Suki (AUS) – 85 Moray Place

Melbourne street artist Suki brings her own brand of quiet monochromatic beauty to Moray Place with this dreamy mural, reflecting her larger body of work which often depicts woman dancing or moving through urban space.

85 Moray Place.

Phlegm (UK) – 85 Moray Place

Here Phlegm paints his characters riding NZ’s extinct Moa bird.

85 Moray Place.

NeSpoon (POL) – 97 Moray Place

Polish artist NeSpoon’s artwork used local lace patterns for this beautiful piece.

97 Moray Place.

Faith 47 (SA) – 58 St Andrew Street

South Africa’s Faith 47’s romantic artwork entitled “2500 – 2450 BC” can be viewed at 58 St Andrew Street – down the alleyway.

58 St Andrew Street.